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Consumer Culture

Our society is determined in many areas by the consumption of goods. But what does this have to do with art? Artists also create references to advertising and the world of goods in their works. And what happens when art itself becomes a consumer object for artists?

What everyday images appeal to you on the street?

Everyday culture has been a central theme of art for centuries. Everyday images are captured and questioned, while in turn new objects, symbols, innovations, and visible changes in everyday life creep into the minds of artists. Thus, works are created that deal with public images and the peculiarities of everyday life: forms of community, advertising, everyday objects, our consumption and much more. What elements of everyday life would you want to address?

Artist Factory

Artist Cady Noland

was born in Washington, D.C., USA, in 1956.

Artwork Factory

Artwork Cady Noland, Tanya as a Bandit, 1989

Almost life-size, the artist Cady Noland transfers a photo of a young woman onto an aluminum display by means of silkscreen. Holding a machine gun in her hands, the figure stands in our way. The photo comes from a newspaper, the caption becomes a pedestal.

Artwork Factory

Artwork Atelier E.B (Lucy McKenzie und Beca Lipscombe), Faux Shop, 2018

“Faux Shop” is a sculptural installation and at the same time a shop window for a fashion collection. The shop window mimics a women's clothing store. Lucy McKenzie painted the marbled parts of the installation herself in an illusionistic manner. Like moving ghosts, the clothes were either pinned to the walls, placed in the display, or suspended dynamically from wires. The clothes are from Atelier E.B, a collaborative fashion label and research studio that Lucy McKenzie runs with designer Beca Lipscombe.

Pop Art—just cheeky, young and fun?

Pop Art, or popular art, means something like “art for everyone.” Pop Art began in the 1950s in the USA and Western Europe and was based on simple, striking images of everyday objects such as soup cans. Artists created colorful images of consumer goods labels and packaging, photographs of celebrities, and comics. Pop Art was more a lifestyle than an art movement—it was young, bold and fun! Its motifs and modes of representation virtually stuck their tongues out at the overly serious educated bourgeoisie. But it also had its dark sides.

Artist Factory

Artist Cady Noland

was born in Washington, D.C., USA, in 1956.

Artwork Factory

Artwork Cady Noland, Deep Social Space, 1989

Numerous objects are arranged around three metal scaffolding poles: kettle grill, beer cans, burger buns, American flag, chips and a Marlboro garbage can, plus some insignia of rural America, such as horse saddles and blankets. But the scaffolding poles that frame everything create an unsettling, even aggressive mood and seem to prevent any free movement.

Artwork Factory

Artwork Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentlemen (Wilhelmina Ross), 1975

The work on paper is composed of several layers of images: the print based on a portrait photo, a transparency, colored paper and tape. Andy Warhol assembles the portrait of an unknown person using a so-called collage technique. The figure looks at us with captivating eyes in a strong pose.

Is it still in keeping with the times to always want the latest products?

What do we need, what do we want and what makes us happy? Do you sometimes feel that you absolutely must have this new cell phone, book or game? Are sustainability, environmental protection and fair working conditions now becoming more fashionable than consumption? Can our decisions to do without something have a greater impact?

Artist Factory

Artist Seth Price

was born in East Jerusalem, a district of Jerusalem claimed by Palestine and Israel, in 1973.

Artwork Factory

Artwork Andy Warhol, One Dollar Bill (Front), 1962

Andy Warhol’s first silkscreens, made in early 1962, took the front and back sides of one- and two-dollar bills as their motif. In this version, the artist prints the front of a one-dollar bill he drew himself onto the canvas. He colors the background green with diluted watercolor, and stains the main motif with blood-red paint.

Artwork Factory

Artwork Cady Noland, Deep Social Space, 1989

Numerous objects are arranged around three metal scaffolding poles: kettle grill, beer cans, burger buns, American flag, chips and a Marlboro garbage can, plus some insignia of rural America, such as horse saddles and blankets. But the scaffolding poles that frame everything create an unsettling, even aggressive mood and seem to prevent any free movement.

Are you a consumer or a producer?

Are you constantly online and want your own posts to be consumed by others as well? “Don’t just surf the internet, be on the internet yourself!” Such an exclamation could almost be from the 1960s, when Pop Art was causing an uproar in the art world. Except that back then there was no internet, but instead they used mass media such as television, film, radio and newspapers. Andy Warhol foresaw that in the future anyone could be world famous for 15 minutes. Do you think that is possible and desirable today? Or has it already happened with TikTok and Instagram?

Artwork Factory

Artwork Cady Noland, Tanya as a Bandit, 1989

Almost life-size, the artist Cady Noland transfers a photo of a young woman onto an aluminum display by means of silkscreen. Holding a machine gun in her hands, the figure stands in our way. The photo comes from a newspaper, the caption becomes a pedestal.

Artwork Factory

Artwork Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentlemen (Wilhelmina Ross), 1975

The work on paper is composed of several layers of images: the print based on a portrait photo, a transparency, colored paper and tape. Andy Warhol assembles the portrait of an unknown person using a so-called collage technique. The figure looks at us with captivating eyes in a strong pose.

Artist Factory

Artist Louise Lawler

was born in Bronxville, New York State, USA, in 1947

Would you like to be world famous for a day?

Since the 1980s, the media has spoken of “superstars” when referring to celebrities of global significance and universal appeal. The term is applied not only to celebrities in the fields of film, music and fashion, but also to artists. Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst and many others have turned the phenomenon of the superstar into clever artistic strategies—what do you think of that?

Artwork Factory

Artwork Andy Warhol, Triple Elvis, 1963

The photo of the singer Elvis Presley in the role of a gangster is the basis for this work. Andy Warhol repeated the same motif three times on a silver canvas. This repetition was made possible by the silkscreen technique, in which Andy Warhol saw many advantages for his artistic work. The pale figure of Elvis stands out against the metallic background as if in an old film or fog.

Artist Factory

Artist Cady Noland

was born in Washington, D.C., USA, in 1956.

Artist Factory

Artist Andy Warhol

was born in Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, USA in 1928 and died in New York in 1987.