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Current exhibitions

Filmstills aus Mark Leckeys „Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore“ (1999) Exhibition series "Spot On"

Spot On: Mark Leckey

Forever Young Jubiläumsausstellung 10 Jahre Museum Brandhorst München Exhibition

Forever Young – 10 Years Museum Brandhorst

Installationsansicht Exhibition series "Spot On"

Spot On: Jana Euler & Thomas Eggerer

Installationsansicht Exhibition series "Spot On"

Spot On: Josh Smith

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Guided tour

Let’s Talk about Art

Guided tour

Forever Young

Führung durch die Ausstellung „Forever Young“ Themed tour

The dark side of Pop Art

Thomas Eggerer Waterworld, 2015 UAB 1079 Artist talk

Thomas Eggerer in Conversation with Florian Pumhösl

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30 Minutes – One Work

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Sturtevant

Warhol Black Marilyn

  • Year2004
  • MaterialSynthetic polymer silkscreen on canvas
  • Dimensions15.9 x 14 cm
  • Year of acquisition2016
  • Inventory numberUAB 1057
  • On viewGround floor

More about the artwork

Sturtevant was known for repeating the works of other artists. In this way, she turned the visual logic of Pop Art—to reproduce or multiply already existing motifs—back on itself. As early as 1964, she chose works by Andy Warhol for repetition: first his “Flowers” series, and as of 1965 his iconic “Marilyn” depictions. The “Warhol Black Marilyn” shown here is a late reprise from 2004. But Sturtevant was not interested in mere, true-to-detail repetition. She objected to the accusation that her works were simple copies and thus upset conventional notions of originality and authorship, for what then distinguishes her works from their predecessors? An answer lies in the “Marilyn” version shown here, to which there is no direct precursor in Warhol’s œuvre. Sturtevant increased the drastic effect of the original motif. The contour of her lipstick is smeared, her smile turns into a grimace. What was already implicit in Warhol—he began his series in 1962 shortly after Monroe’s death—becomes evident in Sturtevant: Marilyn Monroe is turned into a symbol of transience and mortality.

Further collection artworks

Wade Guyton Untitled, 2004
Josh Smith Untitled, 2012 UAB 906
Josh Smith Untitled, 2012
Nicole Eisenman Cat Walking Under a Disambiguous Trash Cloud, 2017 UAB 1092
Nicole Eisenman Cat Walking Under a Disambiguous Trash Cloud, 2017
David LaChapelle Recollections in America, VII: Love is, 2006 UAB 634 7 I 13
David LaChapelle Recollections in America, VII: Love is, 2006
Cy Twombly Lepanto XII, 2001 UAB 480
Cy Twombly Lepanto XII, 2001
Albert Oehlen Ohne Titel, 1988