Museum Brandhorst

Christopher Wool

Alongside Mike Kelley and Robert Gober, Christopher Wool is the most important representative of Post-Pop Art in the New York art scene. Born in 1955 and grown up in Chicago, he settled in New York in the 1980s. International exhibition curators and galleries were starting to show interest in his works. At that time, he painted or printed words – often quotations or fragments of quotations – in black paint on aluminium boards primed in white. When he expanded his artistic style and his painting techniques by painting over motifs, this recourse to everyday culture seemed more poetic and reflective than that of proponents of Pop Art. Wool lives and works in New York.
The works in the Brandhorst Collection provide a representative insight into Wool’s creative output since the early 1990s. In addition to pictures featuring quotations it also includes examples of over-painting and the late graffiti drawing style, both on aluminium and on paper, and in intimate as well as large formats.

Christopher Wool | Kidnapped, 1994 Enamel on aluminium
		228 x 152 cm Photo: Haydar Koyupinar
		© Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York

Christopher Wool | Kidnapped, 1994

Enamel on aluminium
228 x 152 cm

Photo: Haydar Koyupinar
© Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York